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It is sometimes said that scientists are unromantic, that their passion to figure out robs the world of beauty and mystery. But is it not stirring to understand how the world actually works — that white light is made of colors, that color is the way we perceive the wavelengths of light, that transparent air reflects light, that in so doing it discriminates among the waves, and that the sky is blue for the same reason that the sunset is red? It does no harm to the romance of the sunset to know a little bit about it.
sagansense:

“We all have a thirst for wonder. It’s a deeply human quality. Science and religion are both bound up with it. What I’m saying is, you don’t have to make stories up, you don’t have to exaggerate. There’s wonder and awe enough in the real world. Nature’s a lot better at inventing wonders than we are.”  ― Carl Sagan, Contact

sagansense:

“We all have a thirst for wonder. It’s a deeply human quality. Science and religion are both bound up with it. What I’m saying is, you don’t have to make stories up, you don’t have to exaggerate. There’s wonder and awe enough in the real world. Nature’s a lot better at inventing wonders than we are.” 
― Carl Sagan, Contact

awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

Kiss and Tupac
standwithfreeiran:

Election, Monitored: The tragic farce of voting in Iran

The last time that most of the world peered inside Iran was in June, 2009, when, for two searing weeks, the Islamic Republic cracked open. In what came to be known as the Green Movement, a series of mass protests contested the official results of the Presidential election, which granted a second term to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who has held the office since 2005. The Basij, a state-sponsored militia, crushed the demonstrations; photographs and furtive cell-phone footage captured young people in green fleeing down broken sidewalks, motorcycles at their heels. By the time of the Arab Spring, in early 2011, Ahmadinejad’s election-year rivals, Mir Hossein Mousavi and Mehdi Karroubi, had been placed under house arrest, their mid-level operatives imprisoned and forced to confess on television to international conspiracy, their movement dubbed fetneh—“the sedition.” As the regime silenced the country’s internal press and shunned Western reporters, the world lost sight of Iran’s domestic life and focussed instead on its nuclear program.
(Continue reading…)

This is a bit of a long read but it’s well worth it.

standwithfreeiran:

Election, Monitored: The tragic farce of voting in Iran

The last time that most of the world peered inside Iran was in June, 2009, when, for two searing weeks, the Islamic Republic cracked open. In what came to be known as the Green Movement, a series of mass protests contested the official results of the Presidential election, which granted a second term to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who has held the office since 2005. The Basij, a state-sponsored militia, crushed the demonstrations; photographs and furtive cell-phone footage captured young people in green fleeing down broken sidewalks, motorcycles at their heels. By the time of the Arab Spring, in early 2011, Ahmadinejad’s election-year rivals, Mir Hossein Mousavi and Mehdi Karroubi, had been placed under house arrest, their mid-level operatives imprisoned and forced to confess on television to international conspiracy, their movement dubbed fetneh—“the sedition.” As the regime silenced the country’s internal press and shunned Western reporters, the world lost sight of Iran’s domestic life and focussed instead on its nuclear program.

(Continue reading…)
This is a bit of a long read but it’s well worth it.

tildastardust:

Tilda / Bowie Station To Station

funnyordie:

Time Magazine’s Alternate Breastfeeding Cover
Not sure why they didn’t go with this one.

tildastardust:

Bowie / Tilda covered only by color

awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

Louis CK & Marc Maron

awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

Louis CK & Marc Maron